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Tag Archives: solidarity

Change Comes from the Inside

Being Peaceful Change Change Comes from the Inside Monday, July 27, 2020 As we come to know our soul gift more clearly, we almost always have to let go of some other “gifts” so we can do our one or two things with integrity. Such letting go frees us from always being driven by what… Continue Reading Change Comes from the Inside

Contemplative Activists: Weekly Summary

Contemplative Activists Saturday, July 18, 2020 Summary: Sunday, July 12—Friday, July 17, 2020 In order to have the capacity to move the world, we need some “social distancing” and detachment from the diversions and delusions of mass culture and our false self. (Sunday) Dorothy Day’s spirituality and her social witness were equally rooted in the… Continue Reading Contemplative Activists: Weekly Summary

Peace and Advocacy for the Poor

Contemplative Activists Peace and Advocacy for the Poor Monday, July 13, 2020 Dorothy Day (1897–1980) gives us a clear example of a contemplative activist. In her case, she began with activism, converted to Catholicism around age 30, and eventually lived out her two callings in a powerful and effective way. My friend John Dear, himself… Continue Reading Peace and Advocacy for the Poor

Alternative Community: Weekly Summary

Alternative Community Saturday, June 6, 2020 Summary: Sunday, May 31—Friday, June 5, 2020 People are gathering digitally and in person today through neighborhood associations, study groups, community gardens, social services, and volunteer groups. (Sunday) Without connectedness and communion, we don’t exist fully as our truest selves. Becoming who we really are is a matter of… Continue Reading Alternative Community: Weekly Summary

A New Power

Alternative Community A New Power Tuesday, June 2, 2020 In an ideal sense, a community is a safe place. By protecting and nurturing the dignity of its members, the community is sustained even when challenged by external forces. Virgilio Elizondo (1935–2016), a Catholic priest and community organizer from San Antonio, Texas, compared communities formed among… Continue Reading A New Power

Solidarity: Weekly Summary

Solidarity Saturday, May 30, 2020 Summary, Sunday, May 24 — Friday, May 29, 2020 When the Bible is read through the eyes of solidarity—what we call the “preferential option for the poor” or the “bias from the margins”—it will always be liberating, transformative, and empowering in a completely different way. (Sunday) If one of the primary… Continue Reading Solidarity: Weekly Summary

A Movement of the Rejected

Solidarity A Movement of the Rejected Friday, May 29, 2020 A powerful example of these five conversions at work is The Poor People’s Campaign, which was revived in 2018 by the Rev. Dr. William Barber II and the Rev. Dr. Liz Theoharis. [1] Their work with and for the poor of the United States through… Continue Reading A Movement of the Rejected

The Fifth Conversion

Solidarity The Fifth Conversion Thursday, May 28, 2020 The Fifth Conversion to solidarity is a choice to walk with the poor and oppressed, to be taught by them, and to love them as equals, each of us bearing the Divine Indwelling Spirit within. Although he was raised Roman Catholic and worked with many religious organizations, Paulo Freire rarely used religious language or metaphors to make his… Continue Reading The Fifth Conversion

The Third and Fourth Conversions

Solidarity The Third and Fourth Conversions Wednesday, May 27, 2020 We continue our conversions to greater solidarity with the marginalized. The Third Conversion is when we idealize some of the virtues of the poor that we ourselves do not have. When the lens is cleared by our initial awakening to injustice, it is much easier… Continue Reading The Third and Fourth Conversions

The Second Conversion

Solidarity The Second Conversion Tuesday, May 26, 2020 If the first conversion to solidarity is to befriend or experience compassion for the poor, the Second Conversion to solidarity is anger at the unjust situation that caused their poverty. Many people never reach this stage of anger at injustice, especially in the United States. Our cultural… Continue Reading The Second Conversion

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