Tag Archives: darkness

Searching for Love

Love: Week 1 Searching for Love Friday, November 2, 2018 All Souls’ Day John of the Cross (1542-1591) is one of many Christian mystics who writes about being loved by God in an intimate way. My friend and fellow CAC faculty member James Finley reflects on John’s Dark Night of the Soul as a journey… Continue Reading Searching for Love

Traumatization of Spirituality

Suffering: Week 2 Traumatization of Spirituality Tuesday, October 23, 2018 James Finley, one of my fellow faculty members at the Center for Action and Contemplation, is a clinical psychologist. He speaks expertly—from a professional, personal, and mystical perspective—on suffering and healing. Here Jim explains how Spanish mystic John of the Cross (1542–1591) allowed trauma to… Continue Reading Traumatization of Spirituality

Unknowing: Week 2 Summary

Unknowing: Week 2 Summary: Sunday, October 7-Friday, October 12, 2018 We cannot grow in the integrative dance of action and contemplation without a strong tolerance for ambiguity, an ability to allow, forgive, and contain a certain degree of anxiety, and a willingness not to know—and not even to need to know. (Sunday) Information is not… Continue Reading Unknowing: Week 2 Summary

The End of Knowing

Unknowing: Week 2 The End of Knowing Friday, October 12, 2018 Love never fails. But where there are prophecies, they will cease; where there are tongues, they will be stilled; where there is knowledge, it will pass away. For we know in part and we prophesy in part, but when completeness comes, what is in… Continue Reading The End of Knowing

The Power of Love

Unknowing: Week 2 The Power of Love Thursday, October 11, 2018 The anonymous, 14th century author of The Cloud of Unknowing conveys the fathomless mystery of God and that God can only be known by loving presence—contemplation. The Cloud of Unknowing was the inspiration for practices such as centering prayer and Christian meditation. Today and… Continue Reading The Power of Love

Ascent and Descent

Unknowing: Week 1 Ascent and Descent Wednesday, October 3, 2018 When it says, “He went up,” it must mean that he first went down to the deepest levels of the earth . . . to fill all things. —Ephesians 4:9-10 Philosophies and religions are either Ascenders, pointing us upward (toward the One, the Eternal, and… Continue Reading Ascent and Descent

Darkness and Light

Unknowing: Week 1 Darkness and Light Tuesday, October 2, 2018 Darkness is not dark for you, and night shines as the day. Darkness and light are but one. —Psalm 139:12 Perhaps the most universal way to name the two spiritual traditions of knowing and not-knowing is light and darkness. The formal theological terms are kataphatic… Continue Reading Darkness and Light

the Mendicant, Summer 2018, Vol. 8, No. 3

Click here to read the Summer 2018 Mendicant. This issue features: Ascending and Descending Religions by Richard Rohr Spaces Where We Invite the Divine by Rebecca “Puck” Stair Into the Deep End by Brie Stoner A Transformational Power of Loss by Mirabai Starr A Different Kind of Darkness by Gigi Ross

Hope in the Darkness: Weekly Summary

Hope in the Darkness Summary: Sunday, September 3-Friday, September 8, 2017 Patience comes from our attempts to hold together an always-mixed reality. Perfectionism only makes us resentful and judgmental. (Sunday) It is only by a foundational trust in the midst of suffering, some ability to bear darkness and uncertainty, and learning to be comfortable with… Continue Reading Hope in the Darkness: Weekly Summary

Grief

Hope in the Darkness Grief Friday, September 8, 2017 My friend and fellow teacher Mirabai Starr has become intimate with darkness through studying and translating the work of St. John of the Cross, as well as her own journey through the tragic loss of her daughter. Here she describes the experience of spiritual darkness and… Continue Reading Grief

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