Tag Archives: John Duns Scotus

A Nonviolent Atonement

Salvation as At-One-Ment A Nonviolent Atonement Monday, July 24, 2017 In the thirteenth century, the Franciscans and the Dominicans invariably took opposing positions in the great debates in the universities of Paris, Cologne, Bologna, and Oxford. Both opinions usually passed the tests of orthodoxy, although one was preferred. The Franciscans often ended up presenting the Read More »

Remain in Love

Franciscan Spirituality: Week 3 Remain in Love Monday, June 19, 2017 John Duns Scotus (c. 1266-1308) was a Franciscan philosopher and theologian who in many ways paralleled Bonaventure’s ideas. Duns Scotus helped develop the doctrine of the univocity of being. Previous philosophers said God was a Being, which is what most people still think today. Read More »

Incarnation instead of Atonement

Alternative Orthodoxy Incarnation instead of Atonement Wednesday, May 31, 2017 Franciscan alternative orthodoxy emphasizes incarnation instead of redemption. For the Franciscans, Christmas is more significant than Easter. Christmas is already Easter! Since God became a human being, then it’s good to be human, and we’re already “saved.” Franciscans never believed in the sacrificial atonement theory Read More »

Love, Not Atonement

Jesus as Scapegoat Love, Not Atonement Thursday, May 4, 2017 All the great religions of the world talk a lot about death, so there must be an essential lesson to be learned here. But throughout much of religious history our emphasis has been on killing the wrong thing and avoiding the truth: it’s you who Read More »

The Christ Is Bigger than Christianity

The Cosmic Christ: Week 1 The Christ Is Bigger than Christianity Sunday, March 26, 2017 And in everything that I saw, I could perceive nothing except the presence of the power of God, and in a manner totally indescribable. And my soul in an excess of wonder cried out: This world is pregnant with God! Read More »

Love Is the Nature of Being

The Cosmic Christ: Week 1 Love Is the Nature of Being Tuesday, October 25, 2016 Francis of Assisi understood that the entire circle of life had a Great Lover at the center. [1] For the Franciscan School, before God is the divine Logos (rational pattern), God is Infinite and Absolute Friendship (Trinity), that is, Eternal Read More »

A Nonviolent Atonement (At-One-Ment)

Nonviolence A Nonviolent Atonement (At-One-Ment) Wednesday, October 12, 2016 In the thirteenth century, the Franciscans and the Dominicans were the Catholic Church’s debating society, as it were. We invariably took opposing positions in the great debates in the universities of Paris, Cologne, Bologna, and Oxford. Both opinions usually passed the tests of orthodoxy, although one Read More »

Incarnation instead of Atonement

Alternative Orthodoxy: Week 1 Incarnation instead of Atonement Friday, February 12, 2016 Franciscans never believed that “blood atonement” was required for God to love us. Our teacher, John Duns Scotus (1266-1308), said Christ was Plan A from the very beginning (Colossians 1:15-20, Ephesians 1:3-14). Christ wasn’t a mere Plan B after the first humans sinned, Read More »

Love God in What Is Right in Front of You

Incarnation: Week 2 Love God in What Is Right in Front of You Sunday, January 17, 2016 The God Jesus incarnates and embodies is not a distant God that must be placated. Jesus’ God is not sitting on some throne demanding worship and throwing down thunderbolts like Zeus. Jesus never said, “Worship me”; he said, “Follow Read More »

Reflecting God

Incarnation: Week 1 Reflecting God Thursday, January 14, 2016 We have created a terrible kind of dualism between the spiritual and the so-called non-spiritual. This dualism is precisely what Jesus came to reveal as a lie. The principle of incarnation proclaims that matter and spirit have never been separate. Jesus came to tell us that these Read More »

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