Tag Archives: Creation

Faith and Science: Weekly Summary

Faith and Science Summary, Sunday, October 22-Friday, October 27, 2017 Since the rift that occurred between science and religion with the Copernican revolution, Christian faith has had little to do with discerning the actual evidence that was commonly available in the present, in the mind, memory, heart, soul, and in creation itself. (Sunday) Today’s scientists Read More »

Praying for Creation

Faith and Science Praying for Creation Friday, October 27, 2017 This September on the World Day of Prayer for Creation, Pope Francis and Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew offered a moving joint statement: The story of creation presents us with a panoramic view of the world. Scripture reveals that, “in the beginning,” God intended humanity to cooperate Read More »

Climate Change

Faith and Science Climate Change Thursday, October 26, 2017 Science and religion should be natural partners when it comes to caring for our common home. As Christians, we have a clear mandate to steward Creation (see the invitation to “cultivate and care for” the earth in Genesis 2:15). Yet with real perversity, much of Judeo-Christian Read More »

Evolution

Faith and Science Evolution Wednesday, October 25, 2017 The whole creation is eagerly waiting for the full revelation of the children of God. . . . From the beginning until now, the entire creation, as we know, has been groaning in one great act of giving birth. —Romans 8:19-22 In this familiar passage, St. Paul Read More »

Long Lost Friends

Faith and Science Long Lost Friends Sunday, October 22, 2017 Science and religion are long-lost dance partners. —Rob Bell [1] Faith provides evidence for things not seen. —Hebrews 11:1 Reality is God’s greatest ally. For centuries, science and religion worked together, learning from Creation. As Ilia Delio, both a scientist and a Franciscan nun, says, Read More »

Made in God’s Image

Exploring the Mystics with James Finley Made in God’s Image Monday, October 9, 2017 CAC faculty member James Finley continues exploring The Interior Castle in which Teresa of Ávila describes our soul as a beautiful castle with many rooms; at the center of the castle God dwells. As James shared yesterday, the mystics can’t be Read More »

Meister Eckhart, Part I

Mysticism: Week 1 Meister Eckhart: Part I Thursday, September 28, 2017 Meister Eckhart (1260-1327), a German friar, priest, mystic, and renowned preacher, was also an administrator—prior, vicar, and provincial—for his Dominican Order. James Finley suggests Eckhart’s engagement in the “ways of the world” makes his teachings more accessible to us all, since there’s no requirement Read More »

Divinization

Salvation as At-One-Ment Divinization Friday, July 28, 2017 Yesterday we explored the metaphor of a wedding to describe what God is doing—preparing and drawing us toward deeper intimacy, belonging, and union. The Eastern Fathers of the Church were not afraid of this belief, and called it the process of “divinization” (theosis). In fact, they saw Read More »

One Sacred Universe

Franciscan Spirituality: Week 2 One Sacred Universe Wednesday, June 14, 2017 Often, without moving his lips, [Francis] would meditate within himself and drawing external things within himself, he would lift his spirit to higher things. —Thomas of Celano [1] Francis of Assisi must have known, at least intuitively, that there is only one enduring spiritual Read More »

The Primacy of Love

Franciscan Spirituality: Week 2 The Primacy of Love Tuesday, June 13, 2017 I like how my long-time friend and fellow Franciscan, John Quigley, summarizes Franciscan spirituality. He writes: It is not easy to put into a capsule the spirit and gifts of Franciscan thinking. Its hallmarks are simplicity, reverence, fraternity, ecumenism, ecology, interdependence, and dialogue. Read More »

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