Tag Archives: Franciscan theology

To Live Lightly

Franciscan Way: Part One To Live Lightly Wednesday, October 2, 2019 Today, we will continue with my Franciscan brother and long-time friend John Quigley’s summary of Franciscanism. I’ve added my thoughts in italics within brackets. [Francis] knew that we share this earth, our loves and work with all of God’s creatures, our brothers and sisters.… Continue Reading To Live Lightly

A Bigger God

Jesus and the Cross A Bigger God Wednesday, February 6, 2019 Our predestination to glory is prior by nature to any notion of sin. —John Duns Scotus [1] The Franciscan School, led by such teachers as Duns Scotus, refused to see the Incarnation and its finale on the cross as a mere reaction to human… Continue Reading A Bigger God

Outpouring Love

The Universal Christ Outpouring Love Wednesday, December 5, 2018 Francis of Assisi understood that the entire circle of life had a Great Lover at the center. For Franciscan John Duns Scotus, before God is the divine Logos (rational pattern), God is Infinite and Absolute Friendship (Trinity), that is, Eternal Outpouring (Love). Love is the very nature of Being itself. God is… Continue Reading Outpouring Love

Universal Belonging

Joy and Hope Universal Belonging Tuesday, November 27, 2018 Bonaventure’s “vision logic,” as Ken Wilber would call it, and the lovely symmetry of his theology, can be summarized in what Bonaventure named the three great truths that for him hold everything together. He summarizes all his teaching in these three movements: Emanation: We come forth… Continue Reading Universal Belonging

The Franciscan Vision

Joy and Hope The Franciscan Vision Monday, November 26, 2018 St. Bonaventure of Bagnoregio (1217–1274) took Francis and Clare’s practical lifestyle to the level of theology, philosophy, and worldview. Unlike many theologians of his time, Bonaventure paid little attention to fire and brimstone, sin, merit, justification, or atonement. His vision is positive, mystic, cosmic, intimately… Continue Reading The Franciscan Vision

It Is Not Just About Us

Creation: Week 1 It Is Not Just About Us Friday, February 16, 2018 The Son is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation. For in him all things were created, things in heaven and on earth, things visible, things invisible. . . . He is before all things and in him… Continue Reading It Is Not Just About Us

Christ Is the Template for Creation

Creation: Week 1 Christ Is the Template for Creation Thursday, February 15, 2018 The Franciscan philosopher and Doctor of the Church, St. Bonaventure of Bagnoregio (1217-1274) was an exemplary mystic because he so effectively pulled his brilliant mind down into his passionate heart. [1] In Bonaventure’s writings, you will find little or none of the… Continue Reading Christ Is the Template for Creation

Incarnation Instead of Atonement

Salvation as At-One-Ment Incarnation Instead of Atonement Tuesday, July 25, 2017 Franciscans never believed that “blood atonement” was required for God to love us. We believed that Christ was Plan A from the very beginning (Colossians 1:15-20, Ephesians 1:3-14, John 1:1-18). Christ wasn’t a Plan B after the first humans sinned, which is the way… Continue Reading Incarnation Instead of Atonement

A Nonviolent Atonement

Salvation as At-One-Ment A Nonviolent Atonement Monday, July 24, 2017 In the thirteenth century, the Franciscans and the Dominicans invariably took opposing positions in the great debates in the universities of Paris, Cologne, Bologna, and Oxford. Both opinions usually passed the tests of orthodoxy, although one was preferred. The Franciscans often ended up presenting the… Continue Reading A Nonviolent Atonement

Remain in Love

Franciscan Spirituality: Week 3 Remain in Love Monday, June 19, 2017 John Duns Scotus (c. 1266-1308) was a Franciscan philosopher and theologian who in many ways paralleled Bonaventure’s ideas. Duns Scotus helped develop the doctrine of the univocity of being. Previous philosophers said God was a Being, which is what most people still think today.… Continue Reading Remain in Love

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