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Daily Meditations
Archive: August 2020

Richard Rohr’s Daily Meditations

Richard Rohr’s Daily Meditations are free email reflections sent every day of the year. Each meditation features Richard Rohr and guest authors reflecting on a yearly theme, with each week building on previous topics—but you can join at any time!

This year Father Richard is helping us to learn the dance of Action and Contemplation. You can learn more about the 2020 theme and watch a short video or explore recent reflections. Scroll down to read the most recent post.

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Most Recent Post

Order, Disorder, Reorder: Part One

Saturday, August 15, 2020
Summary: Sunday, August 9—August 14, 2020

To grow toward love, union, salvation, or enlightenment, we must be moved from Order to Disorder, and then ultimately to Reorder. (Sunday)

Law, tradition, and boundaries—what I call Orderseem to be necessary in any spiritual system both to reveal and to limit our basic egocentricity. Such containers make at least some community, family, and marriage possible. (Monday)

This process of moving from innocence to knowledge is never finished. Always there is the realm of innocence, always there is the realm of knowledge. —Rev. Howard Thurman (Tuesday)

For Pierre Teilhard de Chardin (1881–1955), love is at the physical heart of the universe. He viewed love as the attraction of all things toward all things. We could say that love is the universal ordering principle. (Wednesday)

We can look upon the face of anyone or anything around us and say—as a moral declaration and a spiritual, cosmological, and biological fact: You are a part of me I do not yet know. —Valarie Kaur (Thursday)

The ego believes that disorder or change is always to be avoided, so we hunker down and pretend that our Order is entirely good, should be good for everybody, and is always “true” and even the only truth. (Friday)

 

Practice: Brave Creativity

In 2010, Living School sendee Jonathon Stalls spent 242 days walking across the United States. The journey inspired him to help other people experience “life at 3 miles per hour.” As an artist and social and racial justice advocate, his activism is communicated through community building, contemplative practice, and walking meditation. We invite you, as able, to take some time this weekend to move mindfully through your local area. Jonathon offers these instructions:

Prep:
Bring a notebook, invite goals/pains/dreams with you, and perhaps protect some time for pre-writing (What might you want to open, envision, dream, wake up to as you walk/roll?). . . .

Timing & Location:
[Move] at least 30‒40 minutes. Unhurried. Right where you are, and, if you can, the less distractions or barriers, the better. If you can be in quieter or smoother environments, you will have a greater creative capacity.

Safety & Health:
[Bring a mask with you.] If near people, please wear it when you are 6‒10 feet away. Have water, comfortable shoes/clothing, and sun [protection].

Before You Begin Moving:
Pause and take a few deep breaths. As your lungs expand, envision your veins, brain capacity, heart capacity, and dream capacity expanding with them. Be as open as you can be.

Movement:
As you begin to move, seek the realms of wonder, of space, and of reaching high into what’s possible. Look up at the sky as often as you can. As you move, notice the way branches adapt, bend, and emerge from the sides. They started in one direction . . .  where did they end up? How are they filling in and thriving in the spaces where no branch existed before? Notice the way clouds move, plants rest and blossom, and colors evolve as the sun goes down.

After roughly 20 minutes notice what begins to clear, notice what begins to open around your ideas, dreams, and possible barriers/blocks. Be ready with that notebook! I find that it is super helpful to simply honor what comes up by jotting it down. I can then release it, which will allow for more creative room. Try not to overthink or shut down ideas. This is a time to allow and celebrate imagination. If you aren’t noticing moments of inspiration and creativity, don’t worry . . . this practice can take time to set in. In time (and with practice!) it will open and expand your thinking, living, and BEing in beautiful and revealing ways.

I deeply invite you to use this practice alongside how you (how we) can envision a more human way that honors Human dignity, honors and protects our Planet, and honors our own inner journey. I believe we need brave body-based practices that inspire Radical Creativity (centering human justice, planet care, and inner healing) in this time more than ever.

Close:
Take one or two more deep breaths and commit to movement practice as a way to invite brave creativity around dreams, creative vision, conflict, feeling stuck, stress, and more. Honor and thank your Body and the Earth.

Reference:
Jonathon Stalls, Walking/Movement Practices: {Opening} Brave Creativity, Intrinsic Paths, https://www.intrinsicpaths.com/walking-invitation

For Further Study:
Valarie Kaur, See No Stranger: A Memoir and Manifesto of Revolutionary Love (One World: 2020)

Barbara A. Holmes, Liberation and the Cosmos: Conversations with the Elders (Fortress Press: 2008)

Richard Rohr, The Universal Christ: How a Forgotten Reality Can Change Everything We See, Hope For, and Believe (Convergent Books: 2019)

Richard Rohr, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life (Jossey-Bass: 2011)

Richard Rohr, The Wisdom Pattern (Franciscan Media: 2020)

Howard Thurman, The Inward Journey (Friends United Press: 2007, ©1961)

Image credit: Last Tangle (detail), Leo Valledor, 1976.
Inspiration for this week’s banner image: We need a very strong container to hold the contents and contradictions that arrive later in life. —Richard Rohr
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