Tag Archives: nondual thought

Learning to See

Contemplative Consciousness Learning to See Wednesday, January 10, 2017 If the doors of perception were cleansed every thing would appear to [us] as it is, infinite. —William Blake [1] Contemplation is about seeing, but a kind of seeing that is much more than mere looking because it also includes recognizing and thus appreciating. The contemplative Read More »

Jesus and Buddha

Interfaith Friendship Jesus and Buddha Friday, December 8, 2017 In his book Jesus and Buddha, New Testament theologian Marcus Borg (1942-2015) highlights numerous sayings in the teachings of Jesus that are strikingly similar, if not identical, to the teachings of the Buddha who lived some six centuries earlier. There have been some attempts to explain Read More »

A Change of Consciousness

Emerging Church A Change of Consciousness Wednesday, November 29, 2017 I have learned to prize holy ignorance more highly than religious certainty and to seek companions who have arrived at the same place. We are a motley crew, distinguished not only by our inability to explain ourselves to those who are more certain of their Read More »

The Sacrament of the Present Moment

Living in the Now The Sacrament of the Present Moment Tuesday, November 21, 2017 Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing, there is a field. I’ll meet you there. When the soul lies down in that grass, the world is too full to talk about. Ideas, language, even the phrase “each other” doesn’t make any Read More »

A Seamless Whole

Centering Prayer A Seamless Whole Friday, February 17, 2017 Guest writer Cynthia Bourgeault continues exploring the contemplative practice of Centering Prayer. The fruits of Centering Prayer are found in daily life. Do not look for signs that this prayer is working for you in your subjective experiences during the prayer period. The place to look Read More »

Dualistic and Nondual Thinking: Weekly Summary

Dualistic and Nondual Thinking Summary: Sunday, January 28-Friday, February 3, 2017 The dualistic mind cannot process things like infinity, mystery, God, grace, suffering, sexuality, death, or love. (Sunday) Nondual consciousness is a much more holistic knowing, where your mind, heart, soul, and senses are open and receptive to the moment just as it is, which Read More »

Overtaken by Oceanic Oneness

Dualistic and Nondual Thinking Overtaken by Oceanic Oneness Friday, February 3, 2017 Today’s guest writer, CAC faculty member James Finley, shares what it is like to be within nondual consciousness. We approach nondual consciousness by means of our contemplative experience. “To contemplate” means to observe carefully, to pay attention. Throughout the day, things catch our Read More »

Rewiring Our Brains

Dualistic and Nondual Thinking Rewiring Our Brains Thursday, February 2, 2017 Today’s guest writer, CAC faculty member Cynthia Bourgeault, shares the phenomenology of nondual consciousness—what actually happens in our brain as we move from dual to nondual thinking. What if this shift is not primarily about what one sees as how one sees? That it Read More »

Oned with God

Dualistic and Nondual Thinking Oned with God Wednesday, February 1, 2017 Over the next few days I’d like to share insights from my fellow CAC faculty members, Cynthia Bourgeault and James Finley. I trust Cynthia and Jim because they are truly grounded in the Christian and wider wisdom Tradition, Scripture, and their own authentic experience. Read More »

See Everything; Judge Little; Forgive Much

Dualistic and Nondual Thinking See Everything; Judge Little; Forgive Much Tuesday, January 31, 2017 We are living in exciting times, where we are teaching people not what to see, but how to see! The broad rediscovery of nondual, contemplative consciousness gives me hope for the maturing of religion and is probably the only way we Read More »

Numbers only; no punctuation

Need assistance with this form?

The work of the Center for Action and Contemplation is possible only because of friends and supporters like you!

Learn more about making a donation to the CAC.

FacebookTwitterEmailPrint