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We believe that we must build on the positive, on what we love. Creative and life energies come from belief and from commitment. — Richard Rohr Read Rebuilding on a Contemplative Foundation: Weekly Summary
What might happen if we understood the cor Christian ethos as creative, constructive, and forward-leaning—as an “organizing religion”? — Brian McLaren Read A System of Beliefs or a Way of Life?
The new commandment of love meant neither beliefs nor words mattered most. Love decentered and took priority over everything else. — Brian McLaren Read Faith Expressed as Love
Faith points to an initial opening of the heart or mind space from our side. Faith is our small but necessary “yes” to any new change or encounter. — Richard Rohr Read An Open and Growing Heart
God gives us a spirit of questing, a desire for understanding; only this ongoing search for understanding will create compassionate and wise people. — Richard Rohr Read Welcome Darkness and Mystery
God refuses to be known intellectually. God can only be loved and known in the act of love; God can only be experienced in communion. — Richard Rohr Read Faith as Participation
We must move from a belief-based spirituality to a practice-based spirituality, or little will change in religion, politics, and the world. — Richard Rohr Read Waiting with Patience
The future of mature Christianity will be practice-based more than belief-based, which gives us nothing to argue about until we try it for ourselves. — Richard Rohr Read Faith and Belief: Weekly Summary
Why would God need a “blood sacrifice” before God could love God’s creation? Is God that needy, unloving, rule-bound, and unforgiving? — Richard Rohr Read Substitutionary Atonement
My understanding of the atonement theory is not heretical or new, but has quite traditional and orthodox foundations. — Richard Rohr Read A Nonviolent Atonement

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