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Anointing—for healing of illness, the passage through death, celebrating the mystical union of the bridal chamber—is a sacrament of wholeness. — Cynthia Bourgeault Read Christ Means “Anointed”: Weekly Summary
We seldom consciously know that we are scapegoating or projecting. As Jesus said, people literally “do not know what they are doing.” — Richard Rohr Read The Scapegoat
Jesus takes away the sin of the world by exposing the real sin of the world—ignorant violence—by refusing revenge, and by teaching us to follow him. — Richard Rohr Read Savior of the World
We are invited to gaze upon the image of the crucified and to realize that God suffers with Jesus. This softens our hearts toward God and all of reality. — Richard Rohr Read Doing the Victim Thing Right
Father Richard often describes his work as keeping God free for people and keeping people free for God. — Michael Poffenberger, CAC Executive Director Read Thank you for making our work possible!
The language of sacrifice is only one of several different ways that the authors of the New Testament articulate the meaning of Jesus’s execution. — Marcus Borg and John Dominic Crossan Read Layered Meanings
Was Jesus guilty of nonviolent resistance to imperial Roman oppression and local Jewish collaboration? Oh, yes. And it killed him. — Marcus Borg and John Dominic Crossan Read Jesus’ Passion
I believe one of the greatest meanings of the crucifixion is the revelation of God’s presence in the midst of suffering. God suffers with us. — Richard Rohr Read Jesus’ Death: Weekly Summary
If God can become flesh, incarnating in the material world, then resurrection is a natural conclusion. Nothing divine can die. — Richard Rohr Read The Death of Death

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